Wonderwerp #61 – Tutorials

Ingrid Lee

Studio Loos, Thursday April 23rd 2015

Lilian Beidler
John Niekrasz
Todd Lerew
Ingrid Lee
Mamoru Okuno

Co-curated by Ingrid Lee

Doors open at 20:00, starts at 20:30
De Constant Rebequeplein 20B, Den Haag


Artist bios
:

Lilian Beidler was born on 1 March 1982 in Bern, Switzerland. She completed her Master of Arts in Contemporary Arts Practice (CAP) at Bern University of the Arts in 2010. She was invited as an artist in residence to the USA, Finland and China. She regularly shows her work and performs at different venues and festivals in the USA, Asia and Europe. She is currently studying at Goldsmiths University of London. She speaks seven languages and is eager to learn more.

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Ingrid Lee is a composer and performer from Los Angeles/Hong Kong. Her current work explores the physicality of sound, active hybrid and collective listening practices, and ideas of failure and hybridity through the use of illegitimate and inconsequential sounds: feedback, sympathetic resonance, beatings, noise.

Todd Lerew is a Los Angeles-based composer working with invented acoustic instruments, repurposed found objects, and unique preparations of traditional instruments. Much of his work deals with the physical properties of sound and the nature of perception, exploring the use of sound as a plastic medium, and revisiting relationships within a performance environment. Other works examine the effect of isolated elements of indeterminism within mostly-closed systems, and the generation of musical material by deviation from an impossible given task.

Todd Lerew

John Niekrasz is a composer, drummer, and writer from Chicago living in Paris. He earned his MFA from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop in 2004. John’s text-based arrangements and syllabic musical notation interrogate denotative language and examine the spectra of poverty and ornament, rigor and effortlessness, justice and militancy.

John Niekrasz

Mamoru Okuno: I have been interested in the act of listening. I find moments where words merge/split into something other than what they are originally meant to be when layers of words/sentences are heard. Direction can be different for each listener. I am curious what happen when we listen to a piece together in a space. Collective Listening.”

Mamoru Okuno